Stingray Powerboats
Home Comforts, on the water
Boats and Places - Spring 2001

Stingray 240LS

Certified Test Results
POWER / PERFORMANCE
Test boat engine: MerCruiser 5.7L EFI, 260-hp, 5.7-litre (350-cid) V-8, electronic fuel injection, gasoline engine pushing a 21-inch prop through an Alpha sterndrive.
ACCELERATION
mph
0-20
0-30
0-40
sec
5.2
6.8
11.3
TOP SPEED (RADAR)
rpm
4,700
mph
47.2
CRUISING SPEED (RADAR)
rpm
3,000
3,500
4,000
4,500
mph
29
34.2
38.6
43.4
SOUND LEVELS AT CRUISE (3,500 RPM)
helm
88 dbA
SOUND LEVELS AT TOP SPEED:
helm
94 dbA
SPECIFICATIONS
Length
22 ft. 3 in.
7.1m
Fuel
68gal
257 L
Beam
8 ft. 6 in.
2.59 m
Weight
4,425 lb.
2,007 kg
Speed testing by Stalker radar

Stingray 240LS Interior View
 

Stingray Boats, based in Hartsville, South Carolina, was an early proponent of computerization and automation in boatbuilding. It has continued that commitment to technology and the result is a line of sport boats with top performance and high construction quality.

That become apparent once again last fall when Boats & Places tested the Stingray 240LS bowrider on Lake Ontario. While computer-controlled manufacturing and widespread use of CAD-CAM technology helps a builder keep costs down through efficiency, those same efficiencies benefit the final boat buyer. Just being able to build boats within strict weight specification tolerances consistently means that those boats should also have predictable performance attributes.

With the 240LS, equipped with Stingray's patented Z plane hull, we were predicting good performance. On the water, we weren't disappointed, possibly because Stingray is a high-tech player with a firm foundation of over 20 years of experience.

The Z in the Z-plane hull refers to the slightly reserved chines and strakes (with a Z shape) in the hull, plus keel and transom configurations that contribute to improved planing, lower fuel consumption and better handling. The hull bites in the water when it's needed (in the corners) yet allows a higher-aspect ride to reduce drag at speed.

A day on the water is made more comfortable with a cockpit table, enclosed locking head compartment (located in the port-side helm console, complete with porthole) high-power CD player, fresh water sink (in a console behind the companion seat), curved windshield and integrated swim platform.

Boater comfort has been enhanced through the use of ergonomic engineering and design (with Stingray's design department utilizing a computerized human model). The result is a roomy bow area (with useful flat step to allow boarding from the bow) with comfortable backrests and lots of storage. In the cockpit, there are swiveling buckets forward and a U-shaped bench aft that can convert to a huge sunpad or be set up with a table. There are two moulded-in compartments aft of the forward seats, with the sink to port and storage to starboard. Thanks to careful use of ergonomics, there's always adequate legroom and headroom, correct helm position, convenient control location and overall comfort.

On the water, the boat also comes through in the performance department. Equipped with a 5.7 L EFI Mercury MerCruiser and a 21-inch prop, the 240LS reaches a top speed of 47.2 mph at 4,700 rpm. Cruising speeds are fine -- 29 mph at 3,000 rpm and 34.2 mph at 3,500 rpm. In acceleration trials, the boat reaches 30 mph in 6.7 seconds, also good for such a big bowrider. Waves and rough water? No problem. Handling is also steady through hard "S" turns and other test manoeuvres.

The test boat was equipped with power steering and also included a remote oil change system.

A family or group of friends could spend an entire day on the water, aboard the 240LS. As a practical crowd-friendly day-cruiser, it's a winner.

Rod Morris
Boats and Places Magazine




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